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Makeshift Repair

You stand on your side
of the fracture;
I stand on mine.

We both
look down
at the cracked
gap
between us
and silently
put together
our options.

We can
each
choose to
limp away
and let
the fracture
try to
fix itself.

But if we do,
There could be
nerve damage,
leaving us
with
deadened feeling
and a lost
sense of touch.

There’s also
the possibility
of
infection,
which,
if left untreated,
could
result in
amputation.

Then again,
one of us
might
decide to
toss a line
across
the divide
and tell
the other
to give
tightrope-walking
a try.

And be told
in return
to take
their lifeline
back
and
give auto asphyxiation
a try,
someone said it’s a lot of fun.

But,
as I’m sure
you know,
both
rope routines
are a tad too
dramatic,
particularly
because
there’s no
audience
for us
to captivate
with such
daring stunts.

It’s just
us two
here,
now.

So whaddya say
we avoid
all that,
go the
practical route,
and patch things up
with a roll of
duct tape?

Duct tape
is at least
as strong
as any cast—
in fact,
duct tape
is the thing
most often used
to repair
casts.

We’ll rig-up
a makeshift splint
to bind together
the break
between us,
and we’ll be
building
a temporary
bridge
at the same time.

Then we can
cross the chasm
and get together
to determine
what we want
to do about
“our problem.”

After
we finish
congratulating
ourselves,
of course,
on completing
our hybrid
splint/bridge,
courtesy of
duct tape.

You know,
I think
our
performing
an engineering
feat
so ridiculous,
yet at the same time,
so practical,
is going to be
one for the books,
don’t you?

Ridiculous,
yet practical…

You don’t see
the two concepts
team up that often.

Something this big
is going to call for
a toast.

Maybe
multiple toasts.

So let’s
rig this thing
together,
and then
get going on
our
way.

Whaddya say?

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